News

(Discovery News) Colliding Black Holes and the Dawn of Gravitational Astronomy

New simulations of the most energetic collisions in the universe are helping astrophysicists understand how gravitational waves are generated, possibly giving us an exciting glimpse into the future of gravitational astronomy.

(Space Fellowship) Race to Detect Gravitational Waves Advances with New NANOGrav Physics Frontiers Center

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) $14.5 million over 5 years to create and operate a Physics Frontiers Center (PFC). The NANOGrav PFC will address a transformational challenge in astrophysics: the detection of low-frequency gravitational waves. Gravitational waves are elusive ripples in the fabric of space-time, which theories predict should arise from extremely energetic and large-scale cosmic events [...]

(ScienceDaily) As stars form, magnetic fields influence regions big and small

Stars form when gravity pulls together material within giant clouds of gas and dust. But gravity isn't the only force at work. Both turbulence and magnetic fields battle gravity, either by stirring things up or by channeling and restricting gas flows, respectively. New research focusing on magnetic fields shows that they influence star formation on a variety of scales, from hundreds of light-years down to a fraction of a light-year.

(ScienceDaily) Comet dust: Planet Mercury's 'invisible paint'

Scientists have long puzzled over the planet Mercury's excessively dark surface. New research suggests that carbon from passing comets could be the planet's mystery darkening agent.

(Discovery News) Hunting for Exomoons That May Host Alien Life

The search for alien life doesn't end within the boundaries of our solar system. Scientists are now search for moons orbiting alien planets that might play host to extraterrestrial life.

(Space Fellowship) As Stars Form, Magnetic Fields Influence Regions Big and Small

Cambridge, MA - Stars form when gravity pulls together material within giant clouds of gas and dust. But gravity isn't the only force at work. Both turbulence and magnetic fields battle gravity, either by stirring things up or by channeling and restricting gas flows, respectively. New research focusing on magnetic fields shows that they influence star formation on a variety of scales, from hundreds of light-years down to a fraction of a light-year. The new study, which the journal Nature is p [...]

(ScienceDaily) Earthlike 'Star Wars' Tatooines may be common

Luke Skywalker's home in "Star Wars" is the desert planet Tatooine, with twin sunsets because it orbits two stars. So far, only uninhabitable gas-giant planets have been identified circling such binary stars, and many researchers believe rocky planets cannot form there. Now, mathematical simulations show that Earthlike, solid planets such as Tatooine likely exist and may be widespread.

(euronews) New app solves maths equations in seconds

While helping their children solve basic math problems is possible for most parents for a while, it can become tricky as the exercises get more and…




(Space Fellowship) Saturn Spacecraft Returns to the Realm of Icy Moons

A dual view of Saturn's icy moon Rhea marks the return of NASA's Cassini spacecraft to the realm of the planet's icy satellites. This follows nearly two years during which the spacecraft's orbits carried it high above the planet's poles. Those paths limited the mission's ability to encounter the moons, apart from regular flybys of Titan. Cassini's orbit will remain nearly equatorial for the remainder of 2015, during which the spacecraft will have four close encounters with Titan, two with Dio [...]

(euronews) Building for the future with self-repairing concrete

Bridges, tunnels and other civil engineering structures could become safer thanks to self-repairing being developed as part of a "European research…